Discussion:
C++ code examples
(too old to reply)
Iain
2001-01-23 21:03:33 UTC
Permalink
Ok

I guess from the response I got that VB is not a good
language to use for DSP applications on a PC.

Although I hae dabbled in C/C++ I have never really
done anything semi complex. I've just installed
Borland Builder and started to refresh myself

Is there anyone who could point me in the right
direction in regards to using C++ to take samples from
the PC sound card, process the data and then send it
back out, in an efficeint manor. (WIN98)

If anyone has some example code that does this, I
would be gratefull.

Regards

Iain

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Phil Burk
2001-01-23 22:14:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Iain
Is there anyone who could point me in the right
direction in regards to using C++ to take samples from
the PC sound card, process the data and then send it
back out, in an efficeint manor. (WIN98)
Check out PortAudio. It is a simple, portable, open-source 'C' API for
reading and writing audio that works on Mac and PC. Implementations for
Linux and other platforms are in progress. There is an example called
"pa_fuzz.c" that demonstrates a simple effects processor.

http://www.softsynth.com/portaudio/
--
Phil Burk
http://www.softsynth.com

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Darren Reid
2001-01-24 01:27:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phil Burk
Check out PortAudio. It is a simple, portable, open-source 'C' API for
reading and writing audio that works on Mac and PC. Implementations for
Linux and other platforms are in progress. There is an example called
"pa_fuzz.c" that demonstrates a simple effects processor.
I just tried out PortAudio for the first time, and it works like a dream.
The only problem I noted was a small error in Phil's dsound_wrapper.c:

line 157:
(LPLPVOID)&pDSBuffData
should be
(LPVOID)&pDSBuffData

I highly recommend PortAudio to anyone looking for an easy way to get audio
in/out of their computer. The open-source nature of it is rather nice.

-Darren


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Phil Burk
2001-01-24 02:48:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Darren Reid
I just tried out PortAudio for the first time, and it works like a dream.
Thanks for the bug fix! This is EXACTLY what I like about open source.
Lots of eyeballs looking at the code make it better. If anyone notices
any more improvements that can be made, please let me know.

BTW, I am working with Ross on a new WAVE driver implementation. We will
probably release updated DirectSound and WAVE implementations later this
week.
--
Phil Burk
http://www.softsynth.com/portaudio/

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Michael Gogins
2001-01-25 00:37:31 UTC
Permalink
Apropos soundfile writing and reading... please?

There are soundfile libraries on Linux, also I have a C++ class that reads
and writes (not all chunks of) Wave soundfiles in musically useful ways,
i.e. access is by time and channel, and lets one mix sounds into an existing
file, which you can have if you're interested.


----- Original Message -----
From: Phil Burk <***@softsynth.com>
To: <music-***@shoko.calarts.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2001 9:48 PM
Subject: Re: [music-dsp] C++ code examples
Post by Phil Burk
Post by Darren Reid
I just tried out PortAudio for the first time, and it works like a dream.
Thanks for the bug fix! This is EXACTLY what I like about open source.
Lots of eyeballs looking at the code make it better. If anyone notices
any more improvements that can be made, please let me know.
BTW, I am working with Ross on a new WAVE driver implementation. We will
probably release updated DirectSound and WAVE implementations later this
week.
--
Phil Burk
http://www.softsynth.com/portaudio/
dupswapdrop -- the music-dsp mailing list and website: subscription info,
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Phil Burk
2001-01-25 01:29:11 UTC
Permalink
I have a terminology question. What do folks call the basic Windows
audio driver that has the waveOutWrite() function. It does basic PCM
output and input like DirectSound.

I have seen it call the "WAVE" driver but that can be confused with the
.WAV file format. It has also been called "WinMM", "MMIO", "WMME"(?),
etc. I am working on a PortAudio implementation for "that driver" with
Ross Bencina and I'm not sure what to call it.
--
Phil Burk
http://www.softsynth.com

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Michael Gogins
2001-01-26 01:12:03 UTC
Permalink
Windows MultiMedia Extensions or WMME is one term (the original). The others
you mention are also valid. It is indeed called the "Wave" driver.
Most Windows APIs are now gathered into one "Platform SDK" and this includes
both WMME and DirectX, which in turn includes DirectSound, DirectMusic, and
DirectShow.

----- Original Message -----
From: Phil Burk <***@softsynth.com>
To: <music-***@shoko.calarts.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 8:29 PM
Subject: [music-dsp] waveOutWrite() = "WAVE" or "WMME" or "MMIO"
Post by Phil Burk
I have a terminology question. What do folks call the basic Windows
audio driver that has the waveOutWrite() function. It does basic PCM
output and input like DirectSound.
I have seen it call the "WAVE" driver but that can be confused with the
.WAV file format. It has also been called "WinMM", "MMIO", "WMME"(?),
etc. I am working on a PortAudio implementation for "that driver" with
Ross Bencina and I'm not sure what to call it.
--
Phil Burk
http://www.softsynth.com
dupswapdrop -- the music-dsp mailing list and website: subscription info,
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Kirill 'Big K' Katsnelson
2001-01-25 03:58:06 UTC
Permalink
Some time ago, Phil Burk wrote...
Post by Phil Burk
I have a terminology question. What do folks call the basic Windows
audio driver that has the waveOutWrite() function. It does basic PCM
output and input like DirectSound.
Phil,

You are already mixing two technologies.

The wave*() set of API was first introduced in "multimedia extensions"
(MME) to Windows 3.0. Historically, it has been referred to as MME,
although Microsoft folk usually call it "wave API" (lowercase).

There is a corresponding driver concept, which are also called "MME"
or "wave" drivers, in both 9x and NT kernels, historically the
first one.

DirectSound is a different set of API. It is COM-based.

There are also "DirectX" drivers for 9x only. These were defined
in DirectX specification, along with DirectSound I/O.

There is a new driver model, WDM, and, correspondingly, WDM drivers.
There is no corresponding new API - DirectSound is the recommended
one, and wave is supported for legacy applications.

You can use either API (wave or DirectSound) to access either type
of driver (MME, DirectX or WDM), on either platform, with some quirks
and kluges.

Hope this helps,

-kkm


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Phil Burk
2001-01-25 16:32:33 UTC
Permalink
Hello Kirill,

Thanks for the explanation. Since "MME" and "WAVE" are both appropriate,
I will use "MME" to avoid confusion with .WAV file formats. When I have
told people we are writing a WAVE implementation they sometimes think it
does file I/O.
Post by Kirill 'Big K' Katsnelson
Some time ago, Phil Burk wrote...
Post by Phil Burk
I have a terminology question. What do folks call the basic Windows
audio driver that has the waveOutWrite() function. It does basic PCM
output and input like DirectSound.
You are already mixing two technologies.
DirectSound is a different set of API. It is COM-based.
No. I should have said: "It does basic PCM output and input SIMILAR TO
DirectSound." We already have a separate DirectSound implementation. I
was just wondering what to call our new MME/WAVE implementation.
Post by Kirill 'Big K' Katsnelson
There is a new driver model, WDM, and, correspondingly, WDM drivers.
There is no corresponding new API - DirectSound is the recommended
one, and wave is supported for legacy applications.
You can use either API (wave or DirectSound) to access either type
of driver (MME, DirectX or WDM), on either platform, with some quirks
and kluges.
Oh! That's good news. I was expecting to have to write a new version of
PortAudio for WDM. But I guess if I just install WDM DRIVERS then they
will show up under the list of available devices under the MME API.
--
Phil Burk
http://www.softsynth.com

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Darren Reid
2001-01-25 13:30:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Gogins
Apropos soundfile writing and reading... please?
Not sure what you are driving at, Michael.
Post by Michael Gogins
There are soundfile libraries on Linux, also I have a C++ class that reads
and writes (not all chunks of) Wave soundfiles in musically useful ways,
i.e. access is by time and channel, and lets one mix sounds into an existing
file, which you can have if you're interested.
Thank you for the offer, but Phil already has the main Wave reading and
playing code done...and I'm working on Octave-specific code, in a mostly
Matlab-like language. Neither Linux libraries nor C++ classes are going to
help in this specific instance.

That C++ class might be useful later, if I go the route of speeding up the
Octave script code by compiling a C program to link to Octave...but I know
nothing about that currently except that it is possible. I won't need most
of the functionality of your class though, and converting my current Octave
code to C/C++ is very straightforward.

The music-dsp file archive would be a great place for all of this stuff:
that's where I'm going to send the Octave scripts when they are debugged.

-Darren


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Phil Burk
2001-01-25 17:11:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Gogins
Post by Michael Gogins
There are soundfile libraries on Linux, also I have a C++ class that reads
and writes (not all chunks of) Wave soundfiles in musically useful ways,
i.e. access is by time and channel, and lets one mix sounds into an
existing
Post by Michael Gogins
file, which you can have if you're interested.
Thank you for the offer, but Phil already has the main Wave reading and
playing code done...
Just to be clear, the WAVE code I referred to recently was an
implementation of PortAudio for MME/WAVE API. It does hardware I/O. It
is not a .WAV soundfile reader/writer. I should call it the MME
implementation to avoid confusion with .WAV files.

Also Ross Bencina is the primary developer of the MME implementation.
I'm just merging his code with some of mine.
--
Phil Burk
http://www.softsynth.com

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Michael Gogins
2001-01-24 00:18:14 UTC
Permalink
What is your reason for wanting to write this low level code yourself? Is
the actual sound input and output code that interests you, or do you have
some musical use in mind? If you have a musical purpose, then go directly to
ASIO or PortAudio and forget about coding input and output yourself.

There are a number of libraries and standards for this purpose. ASIO is
currently the commercial standard for real-time audio drivers on Windows.
You have to get a development kit from Steinberg at
http://service.steinberg.net/webdoc.nsf/show/developer_e. It is difficult to
write an ASIO driver, but many sound cards come with them. I've never tried
to use ASIO in code, but I do use the ASIO driver in my soundcard with my
commercial music software (Cubase, Reaktor, Cool Edit Pro, etc.),and it
works better than anything else.

If you don't need ASIO's excellent performance and suitability to Cubase and
other Steinberg products, or if you just don't want to work so hard, check
out Ross Bencina and Phil Burk's http://www.softsynth.com/portaudio/. This
is free and easy to use.

Microsoft code for similar purposes can be found in the DirectX Audio and
DirectShow APIs at http://msdn.microsoft.com/directx/default.asp. The
DirectX Audio stuff is fine for low-latency audio output, and not too hard
to code, but not so good for input. It is sometimes hard and sometimes easy
to work with, but there are lots of example projects to help you along.

The above applies to Windows. For Linux, see
http://www.bright.net/~dlphilp/linuxsound/

----- Original Message -----
From: Iain <***@yahoo.co.uk>
To: <music-***@shoko.calarts.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2001 4:03 PM
Subject: [music-dsp] C++ code examples
Post by Iain
Ok
I guess from the response I got that VB is not a good
language to use for DSP applications on a PC.
Although I hae dabbled in C/C++ I have never really
done anything semi complex. I've just installed
Borland Builder and started to refresh myself
Is there anyone who could point me in the right
direction in regards to using C++ to take samples from
the PC sound card, process the data and then send it
back out, in an efficeint manor. (WIN98)
If anyone has some example code that does this, I
would be gratefull.
Regards
Iain
____________________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
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L***@caresystems.com.au
2001-01-24 01:58:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Iain
direction in regards to using C++ to take samples from
the PC sound card, process the data and then send it
back out, in an efficeint manor. (WIN98)
depends on the ratio of compatibility of different sound cards and
performance (ie overall delay cause by latency/doulbe buffersing etc.)
winmm.lib (standard with win32 api) is probably most generic one in that
it will work with a _lot_ of soundcards - but the latency, the latency...

the code examples are all in win32 api sdk which i am sure your
compiler has.
_

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L***@caresystems.com.au
2001-01-24 02:09:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael Gogins
It is difficult
to write an ASIO driver, but many sound cards come with them.
could you give few examples please? (win95/98/nt/2k compatible)
_

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Michael Gogins
2001-01-24 23:59:22 UTC
Permalink
My soundcard is the M Audio Delta 66. It has 4 analog ins and outs and 2
digital ins and outs. It sounds very good and has worked without complaint,
and comes with its own ASIO, DirectX, and of course WMME drivers.

----- Original Message -----
From: <***@caresystems.com.au>
To: <music-***@shoko.calarts.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, January 23, 2001 9:09 PM
Subject: Re: [music-dsp] C++ code examples
Post by L***@caresystems.com.au
Post by Michael Gogins
It is difficult
to write an ASIO driver, but many sound cards come with them.
could you give few examples please? (win95/98/nt/2k compatible)
_
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L***@caresystems.com.au
2001-01-25 06:45:39 UTC
Permalink
On 24 Jan 2001, at 18:59, Michael Gogins wrote:
yeah ,
i just wanted to compare the price range vs the availability of support for
Steinb. drivers, what is this M Audio Delta in terms of $?

i am trying to see how many cards below $250 or so support drivers
apart of MMe and DirX.
for example sblive with spdiff or some usb io card is not that expensive
while providing digital io - thus do you think sblive has Steinb. drivers
support?
Post by Michael Gogins
My soundcard is the M Audio Delta 66. It has 4 analog ins and outs and 2
digital ins and outs. It sounds very good and has worked without complaint,
and comes with its own ASIO, DirectX, and of course WMME drivers.
_

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Michael Gogins
2001-01-26 01:32:49 UTC
Permalink
I haven't used the SB Live, but it has an excellent reputation.

You may want to consult Computer Music magazine, published in the United
Kingdom and certainly available at a number of newsstands in New York. They
keep running listings of current gear with ratings and comments.

I forget how much my sound card cost, probably something like $300 US or
less.

----- Original Message -----
From: <***@caresystems.com.au>
To: <music-***@shoko.calarts.edu>
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2001 1:45 AM
Subject: Re: [music-dsp] C++ code examples
Post by L***@caresystems.com.au
yeah ,
i just wanted to compare the price range vs the availability of support for
Steinb. drivers, what is this M Audio Delta in terms of $?
i am trying to see how many cards below $250 or so support drivers
apart of MMe and DirX.
for example sblive with spdiff or some usb io card is not that expensive
while providing digital io - thus do you think sblive has Steinb. drivers
support?
Post by Michael Gogins
My soundcard is the M Audio Delta 66. It has 4 analog ins and outs and 2
digital ins and outs. It sounds very good and has worked without complaint,
and comes with its own ASIO, DirectX, and of course WMME drivers.
_
dupswapdrop -- the music-dsp mailing list and website: subscription info,
FAQ, source code archive, list archive, book reviews, dsp links
http://shoko.calarts.edu/musicdsp/
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Jon Watte
2001-01-25 16:35:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phil Burk
I have a terminology question. What do folks call the basic Windows
audio driver that has the waveOutWrite() function. It does basic PCM
output and input like DirectSound.
It does PCM input and output quite unlike how DirectSound does it. WAVE
is designed for a scatter-gather, buffer-queuing model. DirectSound is
designed for the single-cycling-buffer-with-position-pointer model.
Seeing as single (contiguous) cycling buffer is cheaper to build in hardware,
that's what most the hardware is doing these days, so the WAVE driver
induces copying overhead.
Post by Phil Burk
I have seen it call the "WAVE" driver but that can be confused with the
.WAV file format.
It is intended to be confused. The "fmt " chunk in a WAV file is exactly the
format structure you pass to a WAVE driver to configure it. WAV files
are pretty much a flattened version of a session with a WAVE driver.

"wav" or "WAVE" are good names/prefixes for this driver.

Cheers,

/ h+

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Ian Lewis
2001-01-25 17:17:48 UTC
Permalink
I paid something like $299 for my Delta66, but that was over a year ago. The
price has probably fallen by quite a bit.
Ian

-----Original Message-----
From: ***@caresystems.com.au [mailto:***@caresystems.com.au]
Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2001 11:46 PM
To: music-***@shoko.calarts.edu
Subject: Re: [music-dsp] C++ code examples


On 24 Jan 2001, at 18:59, Michael Gogins wrote:
yeah ,
i just wanted to compare the price range vs the availability of support for
Steinb. drivers, what is this M Audio Delta in terms of $?

i am trying to see how many cards below $250 or so support drivers
apart of MMe and DirX.
for example sblive with spdiff or some usb io card is not that expensive
while providing digital io - thus do you think sblive has Steinb. drivers
support?
Post by Michael Gogins
My soundcard is the M Audio Delta 66. It has 4 analog ins and outs and 2
digital ins and outs. It sounds very good and has worked without
complaint,
Post by Michael Gogins
and comes with its own ASIO, DirectX, and of course WMME drivers.
_

dupswapdrop -- the music-dsp mailing list and website: subscription info,
FAQ, source code archive, list archive, book reviews, dsp links
http://shoko.calarts.edu/musicdsp/

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Ian Lewis
2001-01-26 02:17:01 UTC
Permalink
The SBLive! is a wonderful card except for two things: its ADC and its DAC.
I use it ONLY for MIDI, and for final mastering I use the internal digital
loopback device. The loopback (sends the digital output of the EMU10K11
right back to the computer with no analog step at all) is the main thing
that makes the card worth keeping. Which, BTW, is why I tend to recommend
the Value version over the more expensive variants; the digital sound is
just as good and you're not paying extra for what are, in truth, fairly
inferior analog ins and outs.
Ian

-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Gogins [mailto:***@pipeline.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2001 6:33 PM
To: music-***@shoko.calarts.edu
Subject: Re: [music-dsp] C++ code examples


I haven't used the SB Live, but it has an excellent reputation.

You may want to consult Computer Music magazine, published in the United
Kingdom and certainly available at a number of newsstands in New York. They
keep running listings of current gear with ratings and comments.

I forget how much my sound card cost, probably something like $300 US or
less.

----- Original Message -----
From: <***@caresystems.com.au>
To: <music-***@shoko.calarts.edu>
Sent: Thursday, January 25, 2001 1:45 AM
Subject: Re: [music-dsp] C++ code examples
Post by L***@caresystems.com.au
yeah ,
i just wanted to compare the price range vs the availability of support
for
Post by L***@caresystems.com.au
Steinb. drivers, what is this M Audio Delta in terms of $?
i am trying to see how many cards below $250 or so support drivers
apart of MMe and DirX.
for example sblive with spdiff or some usb io card is not that expensive
while providing digital io - thus do you think sblive has Steinb. drivers
support?
Post by Michael Gogins
My soundcard is the M Audio Delta 66. It has 4 analog ins and outs and 2
digital ins and outs. It sounds very good and has worked without
complaint,
Post by L***@caresystems.com.au
Post by Michael Gogins
and comes with its own ASIO, DirectX, and of course WMME drivers.
_
dupswapdrop -- the music-dsp mailing list and website: subscription info,
FAQ, source code archive, list archive, book reviews, dsp links
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Tony Kennedy
2001-01-26 19:13:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Lewis
The SBLive! is a wonderful card except for two things: its ADC and its DAC.
So, what's a good card at the same price? ($150 US for the Platinum)

What do you feel is wrong with the ADC/DAC ??

I have an SBLive Platinum and I've been very happy with it. But, I'm not
doing any professional stuff. Just for me home studio things.

-=-=-=-
24 beers in a case, 24 hours in a day. Coincidence? I think not.

Tony
***@yahoo.com - ***@entermail.net
http://rushtabs.tripod.com - http://mp3.com/DanLK


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James Chandler Jr
2001-01-26 19:41:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Lewis
for final mastering I use the internal digital
loopback device. The loopback (sends the digital output of the EMU10K11
right back to the computer with no analog step at all) is the main thing
that makes the card worth keeping.
Hi, Ian

Do you have to do something special to get a digital loopback from SBLIVE
synth to the sound input?

I had assumed that the Playback mixer on the SBLIVE (which mixes WAVE Out,
MIDI Synth Out, CDROM audio, Line In, etc.) is implemented as analog
circuitry, but maybe not.

James Chandler Jr.


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Kirill 'Big K' Katsnelson
2001-01-30 01:08:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by c***@bigpond.com
I'm looking at doing an "introductory" article on "convolution
processing" for my website. http://www.sonikmatter.com
Brian,

Can you explain what specific information you are looking for?
Generally, convolution is a mathematical operation on two
infinite signals (continuous) or sequences (discrete). However,
I guess that you are not looking for math formulae or, heaven
save, theorems. What kind of "theory" do you want to know?

-kkm


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Oliver Sampson
2001-01-30 22:57:51 UTC
Permalink
Hi, Brian, welcome to music-dsp!
I think that what you're looking for can be found in the chapter on
convolution in the downloadable book from http://www.dspguide.com. I
think it's chapter 6ish.

When it comes to relationships to the Kurzweil and to Kurzweil users,
I think that an explanation stating convolution is the mathematical
process where an output signal is the result of an input signal being
modified by an impulse response, should be a good start.

Basically each sample in an impulse response is a coefficient. These
coefficients are multiplied in turn to samples arriving later in the
cue than the current output sample being processed. The sum of all
these multiplications are then summed together to create the output
sample.

Forget my lame explanation, read the first coupla chapters of the book
at dspguide, and then if you've still got questions, ask away. This
is the right list. There's some pretty good diagrams in there
describing the convolution process to help get your head around it.

BTW, is the kurzlist back up yet? (You can reply privately if you
want.)

Oliver

On Mon, 29 Jan 2001 17:08:17 -0800, "Kirill 'Big K' Katsnelson"
Post by Kirill 'Big K' Katsnelson
Post by c***@bigpond.com
I'm looking at doing an "introductory" article on "convolution
processing" for my website. http://www.sonikmatter.com
Brian,
Can you explain what specific information you are looking for?
Generally, convolution is a mathematical operation on two
infinite signals (continuous) or sequences (discrete). However,
I guess that you are not looking for math formulae or, heaven
save, theorems. What kind of "theory" do you want to know?
-kkm
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====================================================
Oliver Sampson
***@quickaudio.com
http://www.oliversampson.com

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Kirill 'Big K' Katsnelson
2001-01-26 22:01:56 UTC
Permalink
Some time ago, Tony Kennedy wrote...
Post by Tony Kennedy
Post by Ian Lewis
The SBLive! is a wonderful card except for two things: its ADC and its
DAC.
So, what's a good card at the same price? ($150 US for the Platinum)
None, to the best of my knowledge.

Look at M-Audio www.m-audio.com and Echo Audio (www.echoaudio.com) sound
cards; AFAIK, there are good ones in the $300 range.

-kkm


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Oliver Sampson
2001-01-31 20:06:33 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 26 Jan 2001 14:01:56 -0800, "Kirill 'Big K' Katsnelson"
Post by Kirill 'Big K' Katsnelson
Some time ago, Tony Kennedy wrote...
Post by Tony Kennedy
Post by Ian Lewis
The SBLive! is a wonderful card except for two things: its ADC and its
DAC.
So, what's a good card at the same price? ($150 US for the Platinum)
None, to the best of my knowledge.
Look at M-Audio www.m-audio.com and Echo Audio (www.echoaudio.com) sound
cards; AFAIK, there are good ones in the $300 range.
I would also recommend checking out http://www.pcavtech.com for good
comparisons on different soundcards (of many price levels.)

Oliver

====================================================
Oliver Sampson
***@quickaudio.com
http://www.oliversampson.com

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Ian Lewis
2001-01-26 20:32:44 UTC
Permalink
There is no "wonderful" card at that price point.

The analog hardware on the SBLive is, in my opinion, pretty noisy, and its
top sample rate is, what, 48Khz? Not to mention that it's only 16 bit. But
if that's all you need, then I guess it's a pretty good product. It's
certainly the best product at its price point.
Ian

-----Original Message-----
From: Tony Kennedy [mailto:***@entermail.net]
Sent: Friday, January 26, 2001 12:13 PM
To: music-***@shoko.calarts.edu
Subject: [music-dsp] SBLive, not just another sound card.
Post by Ian Lewis
The SBLive! is a wonderful card except for two things: its ADC and its
DAC.

So, what's a good card at the same price? ($150 US for the Platinum)

What do you feel is wrong with the ADC/DAC ??

I have an SBLive Platinum and I've been very happy with it. But, I'm not
doing any professional stuff. Just for me home studio things.

-=-=-=-
24 beers in a case, 24 hours in a day. Coincidence? I think not.

Tony
***@yahoo.com - ***@entermail.net
http://rushtabs.tripod.com - http://mp3.com/DanLK


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Daniel Bertrand
2001-01-26 21:05:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by James Chandler Jr
Post by Ian Lewis
for final mastering I use the internal digital
loopback device. The loopback (sends the digital output of the EMU10K11
right back to the computer with no analog step at all) is the main thing
that makes the card worth keeping.
Hi, Ian
Do you have to do something special to get a digital loopback from SBLIVE
synth to the sound input?
I had assumed that the Playback mixer on the SBLIVE (which mixes WAVE Out,
MIDI Synth Out, CDROM audio, Line In, etc.) is implemented as analog
circuitry, but maybe not.
James Chandler Jr.
The SBlive has a dsp chip (the emu10k1), you can set it up to do digital
loopback. (there's actually to levels of mixers, one is analog in the
ac97 chip, the other is digital in the emu10k1)

With the windows SBlive driver you I don't think you can get
digital loopback (only analog with the "what you hear" recording), but
with the APS driver I think it's possible, and with the Linux drivers
it's a definitive yes. (APS is another card based on the emu10k1)

With the aps drivers you can also do multi track recording (up to 8,
I think). The windows guys are also developing there own
assembler/loader.

For info on programming and on the linux assembler check out my site here:
http://members.home.com/d-bertrand

The windows aps driver hack effort is here:
http://emu10k1.tripod.com/

And of course the Linux opensource driver, assembler and loader/manager:
http://opensource.creative.com
--
Daniel Bertrand


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Kirill 'Big K' Katsnelson
2001-01-26 22:04:51 UTC
Permalink
Some time ago, Ian Lewis wrote...
Post by Ian Lewis
There is no "wonderful" card at that price point.
<...>and its top sample rate is, what, 48Khz?
Holy cats! I have already seen "192 KHz ready" hardware.

Did Congress vacate Nyquist theorem this night, or what's up?

-kkm


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Ian Lewis
2001-01-26 20:35:42 UTC
Permalink
Mute all of the record inputs except for "what U hear."
Ian

-----Original Message-----
From: James Chandler Jr [mailto:***@bellsouth.net]
Sent: Friday, January 26, 2001 12:42 PM
To: music-***@shoko.calarts.edu
Subject: Re: [music-dsp] C++ code examples
Post by Ian Lewis
for final mastering I use the internal digital
loopback device. The loopback (sends the digital output of the EMU10K11
right back to the computer with no analog step at all) is the main thing
that makes the card worth keeping.
Hi, Ian

Do you have to do something special to get a digital loopback from SBLIVE
synth to the sound input?

I had assumed that the Playback mixer on the SBLIVE (which mixes WAVE Out,
MIDI Synth Out, CDROM audio, Line In, etc.) is implemented as analog
circuitry, but maybe not.

James Chandler Jr.


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L***@caresystems.com.au
2001-01-29 00:41:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ian Lewis
The SBLive! is a wonderful card except for two things: its ADC and its DAC.
i was ref. to digital io option (even if only 48 k)

_

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c***@bigpond.com
2001-01-29 12:27:55 UTC
Permalink
Hi,

I'm looking at doing an "introductory" article on "convolution
processing" for my website. http://www.sonikmatter.com

Can anybody suggest some URL's that would be of benefit to me in
understanding this at all ?

I need to know the "theory" behind it.
Problems associated with hardware etc.

Many thanks
Brian Cowell


Soundware Engineer
KurzList Moderator
SONIKMATTER Administrator

ICQ :20402338

http://sonikmatter.com
http://www.soundengine.com/
http://sonikmatter.com/cowzar/
http://www.sweetwater.com/k2000/b-cowell/

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